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Standard Water Heaters

The only thing a propane-fueled storage water heater has in common with an electric storage water heater is the tank. In fact, the cost to operate a propane water heater is typically less than half of what it costs to operate an electric water heater. Even better, propane's clean energy emits fewer greenhouse gases than electric storage water heaters.

Propane heats faster, recovers faster

It's a fact: Propane heats water nearly 40 percent faster than electricity. That not only means less energy use, but faster recovery time when hot water is being tapped for multiple uses. For that reason, a 50-gallon propane storage water heater unit may do the same job as an 80-gallon electric unit. Talk with your nearest propane retailer to learn what options will best fit your household needs.

Shop smart, save money

All tank water heaters do the same thing: Maintain a reservoir of hot water — all day and all night. As a result, a certain amount of energy in tank heaters is subject to standby heat loss. When shopping for a propane tank water heater, you can minimize that loss by choosing models with heavily insulated tanks. The U.S. Department of Energy recommends looking for tanks that have thermal resistance rated at R-12 to R-25.

3 tips for safe installation and maintenance

Each day, millions of people use propane for their water heating needs. If you're ready to reap the benefits of propane's exceptional energy, consider the following tips:

  1. Hire a professional installer. Only a qualified service technician has the proper training to install, service and maintain your new propane water heater. For a list of professionally-trained service providers, contact your nearest propane retailer.
  2. Remove combustible materials. While propane is actually safer than most other petroleum-based energy sources, it's a good practice to keep the immediate area clear of cleaning fluids, oil-soaked rags, gasoline, or other flammable liquids that could be ignited by the water heater's pilot light.
  3. Schedule an annual checkup. When performed by a qualified technician, an annual appliance inspection will ensure that your water heater's pilot light and venting systems are operating at peak performance.